On December 2, 2020, the CDC updated its guidelines to provide two options to shorten the time frame for which individuals exposed to COVID-19 are to quarantine. The CDC continues to recommend that individuals who are exposed to COVID-19 quarantine for 14 days after exposure. However, the CDC’s new guidelines provide two alternative options to

As described here, on November 19, 2020, Cal/OSHA voted to implement sweeping new temporary emergency COVID-19 regulations. These emergency regulations are now in effect as they were approved by the Office of Administrative Law. Cal/OSHA has now provided additional guidance for employers, including the following:

Los Angeles County will issue a Revised Health Officer Order to be effective on Monday, November 30, 2020.  The press release about the order provides that residents are advised to stay home as much as possible and wear face coverings when outside their household and around others.  A summary of the Targeted Temporary Safer at

On November 19, 2020, Cal/OSHA voted 6-0 to implement sweeping new temporary emergency COVID-19 regulations (COVID Regulations) which require employers to implement a written COVID-19 prevention program with 11 categories of protocols covering everything from employee communications to appropriate face coverings. Crafting a compliant COVID prevention program will take significant time and resources. See below

California has issued a Limited Stay at Home Order (Order) for counties under Tier One (Purple) of California’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy, requiring that all gatherings with members of other households and all activities conducted outside the residence, lodging, or temporary accommodation with members of other households cease between 10:00 p.m. PST and 5:00

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) released an advice response memo concluding that a claim that a construction company violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) “by laying off the charging party in the midst of a purported downturn in business due to COVID-19” and thereafter failing to recall the employee lacked merit. The Division

By Calvin Keith and Edward Choi

Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a temporary rule in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that went into effect on November 16, 2020, although many of the rule’s requirements have a later effective date.

The rule includes a mask mandate, sanitation protocols, a required poster, a